“Beverly Buchanan: Ruins and Rituals”

BROOKLYN MUSEUM
NEW YORK
Through March 5
Curated by Jennifer Burris and Park McArthur

“The house and its yard and the road behind and across”—the poetry of Beverly Buchanan’s description of the inspiration for her best-known sculpture was beautifully borne out in the works themselves, small architectures evoking, rooted in, but sometimes wildly departing from the shacks of her native South. For much of the art audience, Buchanan, who died in 2015, is a discovery of recent years, but her career dates back to the 1970s and includes site-specific earthworks, painting, photography, drawing, and concrete-block post- Minimalist sculpture, a range that this exhibition will provide a rare opportunity to see. The shacks—both intricate and raw, both informed and vernacular—will surely pull you in, but this show of approximately two hundred works promises a broader insight into Buchanan’s thought.

“Jackson Mac Low: Lines–Letters–Words”

THE DRAWING CENTER
NEW YORK
Through March 19
Curated by Brett Littman

To play is to enjoy exploratory intimacy with our brilliantly material world. To play with the aesthetics of language is to explore the materiality of the logics and independent vectors exposed when it is released from official grammars. In works on paper that often double as performance scores, Jackson Mac Low foregrounded the metamorphic forms—lettristic, phonemic, graphic, semantic—that emerged when, invoking the spirit of play, he put elements of chance in conversation with intention. Though influenced by the performative poetics of John Cage and by the Fluxus ethos, Mac Low’s VocabulariesDrawing-Asymmetries, and Gathas uniquely merge poetry, music, and visual art in an almost synesthetic manner. Largely comprising drawings, this exhibition brings together eighty-two works from 1947 to 2000, including Mac Low’s 1961 Fluxfilm, Tree* Movie. The catalogue offers essays by poet Sylvia Gorelick and the show’s curator.

“Inventing Downtown: Artist-Run Galleries in New York City, 1952–1965”

GREY ART GALLERY
NEW YORK
Through April 1
Curated by Melissa Rachleff

In the Beatnik decade, before Pop art went big and the contemporary market we know today began to take shape, artist-operated exhibition spaces in New York served as integral counterparts to the city’s uptown galleries. Artists could show and be seen at Tenth Street cooperatives (funded by members’ dues), including the Tanager, Hansa, and Brata galleries, and at off–Tenth Street spots such as the Judson Gallery and the studio lofts of Red Grooms and Yoko Ono. These spaces bore the collective and improvisatory spirit of the Happenings they hosted, but were also effective launch pads for many successful solo careers. “Inventing Downtown” will represent fourteen such venues with more than two hundred items: documentary photographs, ephemera, and artworks in all media. In addition to an essay by the curator, the catalogue will excerpt previously unpublished interviews with some twenty-seven of the featured artists, from Claes Oldenburg to Lester Johnson, Robert Morris, and Simone Forti

 

 

 

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ART FAIRS IN NYC: 2017
May

Frieze New York
May 4 - 7, 2017

March

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The Armory Show
Piers 92 and 94
711 12th Ave, New York, NY 10019
March 2–5, 2017

The Armory Show is America's leading fine art fair devoted to the most important art of the 20th and 21st centuries.

Volta-NY
VOLTA | New York
Pier 90
12th Ave & W 51st St New York, NY 10019
March 1–5, 2017

The invitational-only sister fair of the Armory also takes place on the piers. Founded in 2005 in Basel, Switzerland, Volta has been noted for its focused, often single-artist booth presentations.

 

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SCOPE New York
125 W 18th St, Metropolitan Pavilion  / +12122681522 / scope-art.com
March 2–5, 2017

SCOPE is the largest and most global art fair in the world featuring emerging contemporary art with 7 markets worldwide.




The ADAA Art Show
643 Park Ave, Park Avenue Armory  / +12124885550 / artdealers.org/artshow
March 1–5, 2017

The ADAA Art Show presents exhibitions from the nation's leading art dealers and galleries. Please see website for more information.

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SPRING/BREAK Art Show
4 Times Square, entrance on 43rd Street  / +16465046523 / springbreakartshow.com
March 1–6, 2017

The SPRING/BREAK Art Show is a curator-driven art fair during the Armory Arts Week.

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art on paper
Pier 36
299 South St, New York, NY 10002
March 2–5, 2017

The single-medium fair will gather galleries from around the globe, as well as local dealers in Manhattan — in total, 65 galleries are participating in the fair’s second edition this year.


Independent
50 Varick Street
New York, NY 10013
March 2–5, 2017

This year, the fair founded by the dealer Elizabeth Dee is moving to its new Spring Studios space in TriBeCa, from its space on West 22nd Street in Chelsea.

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Moving Image
Waterfront New York Tunnel
269 11th Ave, New York, NY 10011
Feb 27 to Mar 2, 2017

The show has selected galleries and noncommercial spaces that focus on single-channel videos and projections, video sculptures, and video installations.



Clio Art Fair

508 W 26th St / clioartfair.com

Mar 2 - 5, 2017
By targeting artists without any exclusive NYC gallery representation, CLIO ART FAIR focuses on contemporary art by independent artists.

 

 

 


 


   

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